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Resources from the series: Behold, A Throne

At a time of political instability around the world, when Christians are facing real pressure to compromise morally and theologically, and the future seems bleak, the book of Revelation speaks a word of confident hope.  Contrary to many popular approaches to the book, Revelation is not to be read with one eye on the daily news, as though it were a roadmap to our political future. Rather, it is as chapter 1, verse 1 puts it, "the revelation or the unveiling of Jesus Christ." When asked to give a single sentence summary of the theme of the book during his exams for ordination,  one candidate for the gospel ministry replied simply, "The Lamb Wins!" That's exactly right. The Book of Revelation rivets our gaze upon Jesus Christ, who reigns upon the throne of history, so that we might all learn to persevere through the fleeting and temporary trials of life with our eyes fixed on the finish line.

Behold, A Throne

They are the kind of questions children like to ask from the back seat on long journeys, aren’t they? “Where are we going? When will we get there? Who’s going to be there?” Actually, they’re enormously important questions to get answers to, especially when it comes to matters of eternity. As I said a moment ago, the final chapter of the book of Revelation answers those three questions...

Behold, A Throne

That was, of course, Macbeth’s despairing soliloquy, his famous commentary, on what he believed was life’s pointlessness. Tomorrow and yesterday, he says, are empty things. Life is a “tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.” Meaning and purpose are an illusion. For Shakespeare, Macbeth is a tragic figure, so fascinating precisely because in his context Macbeth was so extreme. His speech is as...

Behold, A Throne

If you would please take a copy of the holy Scriptures in your hands and turn with me to the last book of the Bible, to the prophecy of John, the book of Revelation. We’re going to read from verse 11 of chapter 19 through the end of chapter 20. Lots of somewhat intricate and important material here. A famous passage in the book of Revelation...

Behold, A Throne

“Can’t!” When we say that word we are generally concluding defeat, aren’t we? Sometimes that’s the path of wisdom of course. We need to know our limits, not try to do more than we can do. On the other hand, “I can’t do it,” or “It can’t be done,” may have less to do with our ability or capacity and more to do with our fear; a defeatist attitude. Perhaps...

Behold, A Throne

Richard Bewes, in his brilliant little commentary on the book of Revelation, tells the story of a trip he made to Sweden. He was traveling from the mainland to the islands of Tjorn and Orust. “To get there,” he said, “you have to pass over the famous and very beautiful, Tjorn Bridge. On this occasion, however, I was unable to use the bridge; it was down. A tanker...

Behold, A Throne

When I was in art school I had a friend whose specialty was tapestry and her studio was almost completely filled with an enormous loom on which she wove intricate works of art from loose threads. Now the way to really appreciate a tapestry-like that is not to pick one thread and then begin to unravel it until you see how it intersects with every other thread in...

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